Observations

The narrative of the Democrats this elections season appears to go as follows:

“The previous Republican administration created this mess through policies and programs that produced an economy crushing debt. We have sought to remedy this situation by advancing more policies and programs creating significantly more debt. The Tea Party is bad because it actually seems to want to eliminate or reduce these policies and programs to reduce said debt. Vote Democrat!”

Is it any surprise this strategy isn’t working?

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15 Responses to Observations

  1. Bettawrekonize says:

    I hate when democratic politicians pretend to be for the poor. What a lie. and I know people that believe that nonsense too, “Republicans are for the rich and Democrats are for the poor” and I tell them that’s not true but they don’t listen. They’re both for the rich.

    Republican politicians (and probably the tea party politicians as well), on the other hand, pretend that they’re anti govt regulation. Republicans are only against govt regulation when it helps big corporations. Otherwise they’re for govt regulation that helps big corporations by giving them unfair competitive advantages. At least the democrats admit that they’re pro govt regulation.

    Both parties need to go.

  2. kenetiks says:

    Speaking from my point of view. The dilemma we now face rests squarely on Bush’s shoulders. Maybe not 100% exactly, but his stupidity, rampant ignorance and total disregard for the human condition couldn’t possibly have helped.

    Between the republicans or democrats, I couldn’t care less as long as they do their jobs.

    As for the “Tea Party”. It’s misnamed, has nothing to do with politics and most of it’s inhabitants are willfully ignorant of just about everything. My mother and grandmother went to a rally and brought me some take home materials, much to my both delight and dismay.

  3. Nate says:

    Speaking from a realistic point of view, Bush does get some of the blame. I’d say about 40%.

    50% goes to the democratic congress of 2006 and 2008. They control the purse strings. I also don’t recall Bush vetoing any bills that would have helped prevent the crisis.

    I will admit openly that the tea party rallies that I have been to did not feature lawyers and politicians and the political class giving speeches.

    That said, they were people, people that work for a living. People who know what they want. What they want, by and large, is a less intrusive government. You do them a great disservice by calling them ignorant. I have found them to be pleasant, even educational and always sincere. Never racist, bigoted hateful or violent. I’d admit it freely if they were.

    The great unwashed have votes and theirs count just as much as yours, mine and everyone else’s. The fact that their fliers and other materials haven’t been vetted by a political boss someplace should only endear them to us.

    Given the public’s general support of the tea party movement I would say the detractors are in the minority. I’d also say that liberal losses on Tuesday should really wake up the democratic party and they need to take a harder look on where the country wants to go and not where they want it to go.

  4. Nate says:

    I know it doesn’t add up to 100%, I didn’t mean it to.

  5. jackhudson says:

    My mother and grandmother went to a rally and brought me some take home materials, much to my both delight and dismay.

    I think this statement is extremely telling – have your mother and grandmother ever been to a political rally before?

  6. Justin says:

    Kinetics’ post reminded me of the story I read just yesterday about scientists finding a gene that makes people liberal.

    Speaking from my point of view. The dilemma we now face rests squarely on Bush’s shoulders. Maybe not 100% exactly, but his stupidity, rampant ignorance and total disregard for the human condition couldn’t possibly have helped.

    Didn’t Bush increase medicare funding? Yes, I think he did. But for precisely that and similar reasons, conservatives blame Bush, too, for not being fiscally conservative.

    As for the “Tea Party”. It’s misnamed, has nothing to do with politics and most of it’s inhabitants are willfully ignorant of just about everything. My mother and grandmother went to a rally and brought me some take home materials, much to my both delight and dismay.

    The Tea Party has nothing to do with politics? That has to be the uninformed statement of the year! What can one say in response to that, except “gegen der Dummheit kampfen die Gotter selbst vergebens” (thank you Freidrich Schiller).

    As to willful ignorance, anyone voting for a liberal after seeing Greece, Spain, France, California, Detroit, and Las Vegas implode under the weight of their own liberal social programs would wear the CROWN of “willful ignorance”.

  7. kenetiks says:

    Hold up.

    @Nate

    Speaking from a realistic point of view, Bush does get some of the blame. I’d say about 40%.

    50% goes to the democratic congress of 2006 and 2008. They control the purse strings. I also don’t recall Bush vetoing any bills that would have helped prevent the crisis.

    Like I said, it doesn’t make any difference to me as long as the job gets done.

    I will admit openly that the tea party rallies that I have been to did not feature lawyers and politicians and the political class giving speeches.

    Right, they just have to stop the meeting for a few minutes to try and convince each other that it’s plainly written in the Constitution that the President HAS to be a christian.

    That said, they were people, people that work for a living. People who know what they want. What they want, by and large, is a less intrusive government. You do them a great disservice by calling them ignorant. I have found them to be pleasant, even educational and always sincere. Never racist, bigoted hateful or violent. I’d admit it freely if they were.

    What they want is irrelevant unless it’s for something completely legal. Everyone seems to have this hang up on “We’re the majority, majority rules, we can do whatever we want if we’ve got the votes!”

    I’m all for democracy, but it has it’s limits. Just because people get a majority vote does not mean you can reinstate slavery(I use this as an example ONLY and am in no way saying that’s what they want.). It doesn’t work that way.

    I didn’t say violent, but I do know some of them personally and they are woefully ignorant of just about anything, politics, law, etc. and some are quite racist. This of course is only my personal experience. However I was listening to an NPR broadcast of some tea party founders in Michigan and they seemed quite level headed. Maybe it’s just my area.

    The great unwashed have votes and theirs count just as much as yours, mine and everyone else’s. The fact that their fliers and other materials haven’t been vetted by a political boss someplace should only endear them to us.

    I wouldn’t detract from personal liberty even if I thought I could. Second, the materials I received have nothing, and I do mean ABSOLUTELY nothing to do with politics. It has nothing to do with being groomed by the pros for dissemination.

    Given the public’s general support of the Pro-Slavery movement I would say the detractors are in the minority. I’d also say that liberal losses on Tuesday should really wake up the democratic party and they need to take a harder look on where the country wants to go and not where they want it to go.

    Do we see the error now?

    @Jack

    jackhudson says:
    October 29, 2010 at 10:47 am

    My mother and grandmother went to a rally and brought me some take home materials, much to my both delight and dismay.

    I think this statement is extremely telling – have your mother and grandmother ever been to a political rally before?

    Please explain why this would have any impact on the preprinted handouts and speeches and discussions held at a rally?

    @Justin

    Justin says:
    October 29, 2010 at 10:53 am

    Kinetics’ post reminded me of the story I read just yesterday about scientists finding a gene that makes people liberal.

    Just as scientists have discovered a predisposition to same sex attraction which you will no doubt decry by screaming into your monitor while reading this statement.

    Didn’t Bush increase medicare funding? Yes, I think he did. But for precisely that and similar reasons, conservatives blame Bush, too, for not being fiscally conservative.

    Everyone is blaming everyone else for everything.

    The Tea Party has nothing to do with politics? That has to be the uninformed statement of the year! What can one say in response to that, except “gegen der Dummheit kampfen die Gotter selbst vergebens” (thank you Freidrich Schiller).

    Again I’ll reiterate. This is my personal experience. The tea party rally I’m talking about had nothing, nothing and finally nothing to do with politics. The materials I received(a couple of handouts) didn’t even mention economics or anything else of importance for that matter. No mention of human solidarity or anything else of import to our meager species. Gave no references or support or even an attempt to support any claim it made and incidently I might ad yet again had nothing to do with politics except by an impressive stretch.

    “The brilliant Schiller was wrong in his Joan of Arc when he said “against stupidity the gods themselves contend in vain.” It is actually by means of the gods that we make our stupidity and gullibility into something ineffable.” (Thank you Christopher Hitchens)

    As to willful ignorance, anyone voting for a liberal after seeing Greece, Spain, France, California, Detroit, and Las Vegas implode under the weight of their own liberal social programs would wear the CROWN of “willful ignorance”.

    I don’t make such distinctions. I see humans. I don’t see a liberal candidate or a conservative one. I see the progression of our species and our humanity shining through or I see willful blind ignorance. This would decide my vote. If I saw a man or woman who’s words and actions are for the betterment of the community then they get my vote. If I see a man or woman screaming about Obama, socialism, republicans, democrats, how they look up to Sarah Palin or liberal agendas instead of doing something constructive or making statements that do not conform to reality then they generally do not get my vote. This should not be a hard concept to grasp. Why everyone is so concerned with these pitiful labels is beyond me.

  8. jackhudson says:

    Please explain why this would have any impact on the preprinted handouts and speeches and discussions held at a rally?

    It doesn’t I am just making an observation – have they ever been to a political rally before?

  9. kenetiks says:

    I truly really don’t know. Possibly my Grandmother might have but I highly doubt my mother has. Despite my grandmother being highly intelligent is convinced that listening to “those people”(not the tea party people, I can only assume she meant Obama or liberals) will turn a person into Dahmer and is completely distraught at her $5 or so a month health insurance premium hike. My mother and father both hate Obama despite not being able to explain why or provide a cohesive argument for any stance they take on the current administration. My father loves Sarah Palin also despite the fact she’s(imho) completely devoid of any understanding of just about anything she tries to talk about. So my mother and grandmother went to a Tea Party thing which only shocked my mother and she finally admitted I had been right about what she would hear. Neither has gone back and my mother was completely put off by the whole ordeal.

    The entire thing to me is just a comedy gone horribly wrong.

  10. jackhudson says:

    Well, for better or worse, that is the power of the Tea Party – engaging people who previously would have never have bothered with a political rally.

  11. Justin says:

    “I see the progression of our species and our humanity shining through or I see willful blind ignorance.”

    Like what? You’d have to know some specifics in order to differentiate between two candidates.

  12. kenetiks says:

    @Justin

    Like what? You’d have to know some specifics in order to differentiate between two candidates.

    I already do. Or did you mean that you want to know the details?

    Either way, I think it’s irrelevant. The question I assume is why or how I pick a particular person and not why was I told who to vote for.

    For instance, in campaign ads there are a lot of times that details regarding records are given out. It’s a simple matter to verify some of the details. If it turns out to be untrue or the circumstances are being misrepresented then this candidate is obviously being dishonest. If I see a candidate wasting his or her time screaming about Obama, health care reform, the merits of Sarah Palin’s hockey mom politics and thundering relentlessly about socialism and any other manner of complete and utter nonsense while never once adding anything constructive in the context of what they actually plan to do(besides reform the U.S. into a christian version of the Iranian theocracy). Then this person is obviously nonconstructive, wasting both my and their time, money and resources in a fruitless endeavor to convince me to throw out my common sense and replace it with some conspiratorial, fear mongering, comatose state.

  13. jackhudson says:

    See, I have almost the opposite take – I am a big believer in party politics in the sense that I think a party should take responsibility for the effect of their policies.

    Policies are never advanced by individuals, and it is unlikely that an individual by him or herself is going to be able to advance a particular position – but a clear agenda advanced by a definable group of people gives the electorate a clear choice, whatever the capabilities or claims of one individuals.

    That is why the Democrats should be punished collectively for their failed policies, and this new group of Tea Party/Republicans be given a chance.

  14. Justin says:

    Well, I don’t think it’s “nonsense” to debate the merits or utter lack thereof when it comes to socialism.

    One merely has to look at California, Greece, France, or Detroit to know it doesn’t work. So there’s a legitimate question as to which direction the government and country should be headed. You think it’s a nonsensical discussion, many think it’s an absolutely essential discussion.

  15. jackhudson says:

    I agree Justin – I don’t understand why a certain segment of our political ruling class insists on imitating demonstrably failed policies.

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